CCMP Watershed Workshop (2004)

Workshop Navigation

Overview

The CCMP 2004 Watershed Workshop was convened to plan for the deployment of a community based watershed model. The Chesapeake Basin requires a prospectus for a watershed model to respond to upcoming calls for modeling capabilities from various national sponsored programs, such as IOOS, CLEANER, CUAHSI, NEON and others. A watershed model plan will enable the CCMP to request funds for the research needed to build and use the system. These national programs are waiting for us to take the lead and tell them what is needed.

The workshop was a guided discussion of the environmental community needs, the modeling requirements, the structure of a community model and the tasks and methods required to build it. There are a few examples of full Chesapeake Basin water shed models. A discussion of these models will preceded our discussion of the community model. The CLEANER, CUASHI and IOOS programs all are planning new approaches to cyberinfrastructure database and computing assets of the Chesapeake environmental research community. How these assets are created must anticipate the modeler's needs. The CCMP model plan will be a necessary component to guide these developments and guarantee that they can flexibly adapt our requirements.

Meeting Announcement

The CCMP Watershed Workshop will build a plan for the deployment of a community based watershed model. The Chesapeake Basin requires a prospectus for a watershed model to respond to upcoming calls for modeling capabilities from various national sponsored programs, such as IOOS, CLEANER, CUAHSI, NEON and others. A watershed model plan will enable the CCMP to request funds for the research needed to build and use the system. These national programs are waiting for us to take the lead and tell them what is needed.

The workshop will be a guided discussion of the environmental community needs, the modeling requirements, the structure of a community model and the tasks and methods required to build it. There are a few examples of full Chesapeake Basin water shed models. A discussion of these models will precede our discussion of the community model. The CLEANER, CUASHI and IOOS programs all are planning new approaches to cyberinfrastructure database and computing assets of the Chesapeake environmental research community. How these assets are created must anticipate the modeler's needs. The CCMP model plan will be a necessary component to guide these developments and guarantee that they can flexibly adapt our requirements.

The Workshop will explore the variety of water shed modeling efforts in the Chesapeake Basin. In addition we will hear about the recent CCMP involvement in several Water Shed projects of the Chesapeake Basin. An NSF sponsored Collaborative Large-Scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER) project has just begun which will survey the state of the art of water shed and hydrology modeling in the Chesapeake Basin and help with the planning of this nationwide NSF initiative to build integrative measurement, data and modeling systems for environmental engineering. (Principal Investigators are W. Ball, Johns Hopkins U., M. Kemp, UMCES, D. DiToro, U.Delaware, C. Welty, UMBC and T. Gross CRC). Another proposal has been submitted to NSF to support an Information Technology Research project which will be developing a geo-spatial distributed data base to aid water shed modelers by making available distributed data systems through a single "GRID" computer interface. (Principal Investigators are S. Prince and J. Townsend UMd, M. Kafatos and C. Yang GMU and T. Gross CRC). The CCMP is also presently involved in the planning stages of a Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, CUAHSI, project with C. Duffy of Penn. State.

Presentations

At the workshop, Tom Gross gave an introduction presentation in Powerpoint:

Summary & Notes

Tom Gross introduced the meeting with a PPT presentation covering some of the history of CCMP and its recent accomplishments.

Kevin Sellner gave a brief overview of a meeting with Chesapeake Basin participants in various NSF funded programs which appear to have a substantial overlap in purposes and goals, NY NEON, CLEANER, Mid-Atlantic NEON, CUAHSI SRBHOS, Potomac & W. Shore Tributaries, Baltimore LTER & CLEANER , Mid-Atlantic IOOS, ORION, GOESS.

The need for coordinated, community research is supported by NSF and other agencies, but greater coordination between programs is needed. The Chesapeake Basin researchers can leverage these various projects off each other to everyone's advantage.

Raleigh Hood, Gary Shenk and Tom Gross led discussions about what attributes a community model would have to be useful, what form should the model take, and how can we build a community model. The discussion covered what already exists and what framework systems which are extant.

The HSPF model has been added to and added to since its inception in 1967. However in many ways it is only the sum of it many parts and it probably is decomposable.

Frameworks to hold and develop model systems are not uncommon. The Prediction of Un-gaged Basins (C. Duffy), SME (A. Voinov) and CSDMS: Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and others were mentioned.

The attention to large scale basin models was not universally accepted and the need for tools to work on small scales and the need to be able to up-scale were mentioned.

Does a large scale model teach you how a watershed works? Probably not.

The requirements for a basin wide model also require the ability to focus in on small scales as well, so the up-scaling problem is an essential research topic to all participants.

In addition to HSPF other large scale models exist, SPARROW and SWAT, but neither were thought to be useful to our needs of interconnecting with other models.

Curiously the database discussion was quite amiable. There is enough commonality of models that they all should be able to use the same database, if it were detailed, complete and accessible. To achieve accessibility a layer of middleware will always sit between individual models and the databases.

The conversation turned again to flexible modeling systems. A. Voinov gave a short presentation of the SME system to frame the discussion. The promise is great, a system of models or modules which can be interconnected and access databases for simulation and assessment. Replaceable modules will be interchangeable, with improvements coming on line for the whole system as soon as the sub-modules are updated. There are many examples, MMS, SME, Sesame, FMS, PIHM, Modflow, VIC etc. Problems abound, such as spatial and temporal resolution transformations. Will it be able to do the whole watershed at coarse resolution while doing sub-watersheds in greater detail? Do small scale models even scale up? Will nesting be required? Can small scale processes be replaced by parameterization at the larger scales? How to build the models and modules? Meta-data definitions for modules must be agreed upon. The degree of coupling and default behaviors must be built into meta-data descriptors.

In the next few months we will be attempting to bring up on line several existing watershed models which may benefit from community use. The latest HSPF for the Chesapeake Basin watershed is probably the most accessible one. Several others were volunteered, but will not be ready until more documentation and testing has been completed.

Attendance List

To view a list of workshop attendees, please click here.